skip to Main Content

Foundations for a New Practice; BBA + LOMAP Present CLE Series


It’s that time of the season again: the new association year begins for the bars; the denizens of LOMAP arise from a summer-long slumber/reverse hibernation; and, when everybody else decides, reluctantly, ‘well, yeah, I guess we have to start working again, too’ . . . worst time of the year, by far.  The death of summer is always super depressing.  I come close to not wanting to listen to Brad Paisleyanymore, but still wear sandals through November, as a form of silent protest— silent, that is, aside from my screaming pigs.
Fortunately, we got us some new programs to promote, in order to dull the pain some.  I know that pimping our programming is not entirely ‘original blog content’; but, hey, cut me some slack: Putting together a curriculum is some time-consuming work.  (Opi like this don’t just happen, you know.)  . . . A curriculum you say, sir?  Indeed, I did.  Check it . . .
This Fall, the Boston Bar Associationand LOMAP will present The ‘Foundations for a New Practice’ CLE Series.  The programming series will feature six breakout sessions focused on particular aspects of starting a law firm.  The free, introductory program will offer a collection of top tips, and features a fantastic panel consisting of practice founders, who will relay their best advice . . . so  you don’t have to reinvent the wheel.  (Did I mention it’s free?)  From there, paid sessions will cover marketing, technology, financial management, practice management and business planning.  Topics for these sessions have already been announced, and faculty will be posted shortly.  This group of 3-hour CLE sessions will combine to cover the major components for establishing a law firm.  Whether you’re thinking of starting a practice, or want to make the determination as to whether your prevailing practices are actually best practices, these sessions represent your entrepreneur’s bootcamp.
Making this program series even more attractive is the reasonable price point that has been established for the sessions.  BBA members can attend all 5 paid sessions for $25 each.  Law students can attend the whole shebang for a grand total of $35.  Even non-members are only on the hook for a $175 flat fee rate for everything.  You’d be hard-pressed to find a better value for 15 hours of targeted CLE.
If you’re still not convinced, attend the first session for free, and sign up for the rest only if you like what you hear.
To learn more about the sessions, visit the event page, where you can also register for the entire series.
If you are thinking of becoming a practice founder, or have recently become one, lay your foundation with us.
. . .
Liner Notes
If you’re looking for your weapon of choice, when it comes to celebrities (and/or their body doubles) going bleep-house in music videos, I’d say Christopher Walken is the diamond standard, as modeled by Fatboy Slim.
Christopher Walken has basically made a career of being really, very creepy.  I mean, ‘The Deer Hunter’, the watch scene from ‘Pulp Fiction’, ‘Joe Dirt’ . . .  well, maybe not that last one.
But, Christopher Walken is not just a guy who scares the living hell out of Johnny Depp and assaults colonial troops with a fervor not seen since Mel Gibson’s attacks on the redcoats . . . he was able to parlay his skeevy, I-might-live-in-a-van vibe into some comedic roles, most gloriously on Saturday Night Live.  I cannot mention his best SNL appearance here; but, rest assured that if you knew what I was talking about, you would think it was awesome, too.  He was not-that-Bruce-Dickinsonwith the BOC in the ‘more cowbell’ sketch.  He’s ‘the Continental’.  He’s very forthcoming respecting census information.
Doesn’t this all make you want to buy a Walken Lamp? Now, don’t be stingy with your offer . . . you can use all that money you saved on the CLE series.