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Turning Over a Brightleaf: Platform Offers Template Production and Document Assembly for Legal

The September issue of the American Bar Association General Practice, Solo and Small Firm Division’s new “GPSolo eReport” features my review of Brightleaf, a document assembly platform for legal; but, you already knew that, because you’ve read the title to this blog post. You can read my full review here, in which I do my customary deep dive into the program, relaying what I found upon my return to the surface light. Sort of like reaching my bared hand into God’s Cracker Jack box, and seeing what prize inside might come back outside.

If you read to the end of my review, you’ll find a prize at the bottom, too: Conan O’Brien’s embedded review, predating mine. Yup, that Conan O’Brien.

Am I using a celebrity reference to drive hits to this blog? You bet I am. I’m not above that. Don’t give me that look . . . I’ll drive my desk right out of here.

. . .

Liner Notes

Just a wee one this morning.

I’ve been using Spotify exclusively, lately, for listening to music at work. One of my favorite features of Spotify is that the front page displays new releases. Man, I thought I was cutting edge before; but, now I know every album that releases each week. Of course, I mostly don’t know any of the bands anymore . . . Lil’ Wayne doesn’t really sound like a rapper’s name. Sounds more like a miniature horse’s name.

Alright, so maybe I am old school; but, fortunately for me, some old school bands are still out there, putting out new stuff; and it’s still good.

The Jayhawks have reunited to release their first new album in almost a decade, and the first with original front man Mark Olson since 1995; and, it’s damn good. I heard it on Spotify first, as an identified new release, and haven’t stopped listening to it since.

Mockingbird Time” is excellent throughout; and, while it sounds very much like a Jayhawks album, it has a the Buffalo Springfield/Crosby, Stills & Nash/Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young sort of border to it, around times. Most of these tunes are hooky as hell, though; and, the harmonizing is pitch perfect, which is no mean feat, considering this version of the band hasn’t been together for over 15 years. Many of the songs produce a surprisingly felicitous marriage of folk and power pop. “Mockingbird Time” is worth starring on Spotify; it’s even worth purchasing on iTunes–and, if you buy it there, you’ll get some music videos and a documentary thrown in.

By way of an off-Spotify on preview, standout tracks include:

She Walks In So Many Ways

Tiny Arrows

Hide Your Colors

Closer To Your Side

High Water Blues